The art of cheese making can be exciting and fun. Understanding all the ingredients and how they work will help simplify this process.

Goat cheese is known as chèvre, after the French word for goat. Goat cheese is often higher in protein and lower in fat than cheese from cow’s milk.

In the Philippines, the history of cheese making cannot be traced. Though there is production of processed cheese, the country remains as a net importer of cheese.

Thanks to the clan of Olive Puentespina of Malagos Farmhouse in Davao, the Philippines could now produce cheese comparable to European varieties. Olive, the cheesemaker, uses goat’s milk to produce chevre, fresh cheese, ricotta, feta, feta tricolor, mango chevre, blue goat cheese, aged goat cheese and Queso Regina.

Here’s a recipe from Olive Puentespina:

Whole milk Ricotta
Start with about 3 liters of milk. Add salt, about 1.5 to 2 percent, and heat to 90°C. Measure about 50 ml of white vinegar and slowly pour it on hot milk. Stir slowly until it boils. Turn heat off and let milk settle for 15 minutes.

The cheese will rise on top of the milk with yellowish whey below it. Strain the cheese and drain on sterile cheese cloth. Allow to drain until you get desired firmness, for around 30 minutes. Use this cheese at once with bread or for cooking pasta.

How to Make Goat Cheese

For inquiries, contact:
Olive Puentespina
Malagos Farmhouse Cheeses
Bolcan St., Agdao, Davao City
Tel. No.: (82) 226-4446
Mobile No.: 0917-7001205
Email: sales@malagosfarmhouse.com
Website: malagosfarmhouse.com

Sources: ats.agr.gc.ca, malagosfarmhouse.com

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